Parables of Jesus

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tslawson1
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Re: Parables of Jesus

#61 Post by tslawson1 » 1 year ago

Bobcat wrote:
52 years ago
I think I mentioned before that one newspaper used to have an article in the opinion page entitled, Things I Learned on the Way to Looking Up Other Things. I think our colleague Stranger remembers that too.

This post could be entitled, Things I Learned While I Was Supposed to be Listening to the Meeting. :whistle:

At any rate, the CLAM Book Study last nite (10/29/19) was on the parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus. (Lu 16:19-31)

There was an interesting thought in connection with the words Jesus put in the rich man's mouth (although not discussed at the meeting). In Lu 16:28 Jesus has the rich man telling 'Abraham' that he has five brothers. And that Abraham should send Lazarus to warn his five brothers. The rich man thinks that if someone (namely Lazarus) comes back from the dead, the five brothers will heed that warning.

There has been some speculation among scholars over why the rich man is said to have "five" brothers (as opposed to some other number). And what may be hinted at in Jesus having that in the parable.

Since the rich man appears to be parabolically picturing the Jewish religious leaders, including the Pharisees, some have thought that Jesus might have the current high priest in mind, namely, Joseph ben Caiaphas.

Here is a portion of a Wikipedia article on the Rich Man and Lazarus that discusses that aspect of the parable.

The article mentions other ideas that have been put forward, including the idea that the number five was just a random number similar to the 5 foolish and 5 wise virgins. But the idea in the linked article is very interesting.


Bobcat

Something interesting about that parable is that it draws from Second Temple angelology. In the book of Enoch and other Jewish apocalyptic literature there were angels who were psychopomps (soul carriers) that took the righteous to heaven.

Enoch was said to have been taken to God’s presence by 4 archangels.

Tim


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AmosAu3
Posts: 442
Joined: 1 year ago

Re: Parables of Jesus

#62 Post by AmosAu3 » 1 year ago

Hi Stranger,

Thanks for posting this site. It certainly is very helpful.

Regards, Amos.

Stranger
Posts: 1938
Joined: 3 years ago

Re: Parables of Jesus

#63 Post by Stranger » 1 year ago

AmosAu3 wrote:
1 year ago
Hi Stranger,

Thanks for posting this site. It certainly is very helpful.

Regards, Amos.

No problem Amos,

That's what brothers do, look out for each other!


Stranger

Bobcat
Posts: 3353
Joined: 7 years ago

Re: Parables of Jesus

#64 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

Hi Stranger,

Now that was/is an interesting link! I'll second Amos' opinion. Thanks for posting to this site. :clap:


Bobcat

Index to Parables

Bobcat
Posts: 3353
Joined: 7 years ago

Re: Parables of Jesus - Index

#65 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

Index to Parables in This Thread


This post is an index to posts in this thread. I will also put a link in the first post to this index for easy access. I may not have a complete listing of scriptural references for each parable at first. But as I go back over the listing I will try to fill them all in. I am also trying to have the parables in scriptural order according to the order of books in the NT and in verse/chapter order.

If you have a post on another thread dedicated to a particular parable, post a link and I will update the index.

PARABLES OF JESUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . POSTS

The Sower (Mt 13:3-9, 18-23) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68

The Wheat and Weeds (Mt 13:24-30, 36-43) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67, 68

The Mustard Seed (Mt 13:31-32; Mk 4:30-32; Lu 13:18-19) . . . . . .1, 3, 8, 9, 11, 15, 19, 68

The Leaven (Mt 13:33; Lu 13:20-21) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1, 3, 8, 9, 11, 15, 47, 68

The Hidden Treasure (Mt 13:44) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1, 2, 9, 15, 46, 68, 76

The Pearl of Great Value (Mt 13:45-46) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1, 2, 9, 15, 68

The Dragnet (Mt 13:47-50) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 17, 20, 67, 68

The Vineyard Workers (Mt 20:1-16) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 (Link)

The Wedding Banquet (Mt 22:1-14; Lu 14:7-24) . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 (Link)

The Corpse and Vultures (Mt 24:28; Lu 17:37) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84

This Generation (Mt 24:32-35; Mk 13:28-31; Lu 21:29-33) . . . . . . 66 (Links)

The Faithful Slave (Mt 24:42-51; Mk 13:33-37; Lu 12:35-48) . . . . .38, 40, 43, 50 (Links), 51 (Graphic), 58

The Wise and Foolish Virgins (Mt 25:1-12) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22-25, 27-36

The Talents (Mt 25:14-30) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26, 39, 41, 42

The Sheep and Goats (Mt 25:31-46) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 (Links), 21, 45, 54

The Sower Who Sleeps (Mk 4:26-29) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14, 16, 19, 53

The Prodigal Son (Lu 15:11-32) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 18

Rich Man and Lazarus (Lu 16:19-31) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46, 59, 61, 86, 87

The Minas (Lu 19:11-27) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85


RELATED

Chiastic Structure in Matthew 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68, 70, 71

Conclusion of System of Things . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 71

Matthew 13 and Leviticus 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78, 80

Meaning of the Word Parabolḗ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

Numbers in Scripture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60

WT Commentary History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5, 6, 7, 8

WT Tacking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 13

Bobcat

Bobcat
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Re: Parables of Jesus

#66 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

Links to discussion of several aspects of the parable of the Fig Tree (& "This Generation"; Mt 24:32-35):
Here for discussion of "he/it is near" vs. "the kingdom of God is near. (Mt 24:33; Mk 13:29; Lu 21:31)

This post discusses:
1. How "this generation" and "these things" in Mt 24:32-35 form a literary inclusio with Mt 23:36 and the disciples 1st question in Mt 24:3.

2. Mt 24:32-35 also forms a summary conclusion in connection with the disciples 1st question in Mt 24:3.

3. How peri de in Mt 24:36 makes for a literary break that demarcates Jesus' answer to the disciples 1st question (Mt 24:4-35) and Jesus' answer to their second question (Mt 24:36-25:46).

For a similar thought to the post immediately above see this post and this one. And another.

How the term "generation" is used in the whole of Matthew: Here.

This post has a chart showing a comparison of Mt 24:4-35 with Rev 16:16-21. One point of comparison is that Revelation has no equivalent of the "this generation" time limitation in Mt 24. (And Revelation's judgment of Babylon the Great in Rev 16:19c has no equivalent in Mt 24. If it did, chronologically it would fit in after Mt 24:29 and before Mt 24:30.)

Bobcat

Index to Parables

tslawson1
Posts: 51
Joined: 1 year ago

Re: Parables of Jesus

#67 Post by tslawson1 » 1 year ago

Here are some thoughts I wrote up awhile back on the parables of the Over-sown Field and the Dragnet:

Questions to Ask of Any Participle You Meet:
1. What is the case, number, and gender and what word is it modifying?
2. Is the action or state of being directed toward a verb (adverbial) or a noun (adjectival)?
3. If it is adverbial do you use "while" or "after"?
4. If it is adjectival, is it attributive or substantival?
5. What is the aspect of the participle? Continuous (present) or undefined (aorist)?
6. What is the voice of the participle?
7. What does the verb mean?

Matt. 13:47 ¶ Πάλιν ὁμοία ἐστὶν ἡ βασιλεία τῶν οὐρανῶν σαγήνῃ βληθείσῃ εἰς τὴν θάλασσαν καὶ ἐκ παντὸς γένους συναγαγούσῃ·

I'm focused here on βληθείσῃ (cast).
aorist passive participle feminine singular dative. And συναγαγούσῃ (gathered) 2 aorist active participle feminine singular dative.

They are dative and are attributive participles adjectivally modifying the noun σαγήνῃ (dragnet) which is also dative and are describing the dragnet. The dragnet as one that has been cast into the sea and has gathered up fish of all sorts.

The aorist participle rather than conveying continuous action as would the present participle conveys an undefined action. However, since context is also an important factor in getting the sense of the Greek participle "gathering" may be a proper Englishing of συναγαγούσῃ. The context gives a sequence of events: 1) the net is cast 2) the (fish) gathered 3) the net becomes full. So, if it is viewed as a sequence of events then it could make sense to see the net being cast, dragged and "gathering" fish.

Matt. 13:24 ¶ Ἄλλην παραβολὴν παρέθηκεν αὐτοῖς λέγων· ὡμοιώθη ἡ βασιλεία τῶν οὐρανῶν ἀνθρώπῳ σπείραντι καλὸν σπέρμα ἐν τῷ ἀγρῷ αὐτοῦ.

It is the same with the aorist participle σπείραντι as it is with the two participles in Matt 13:47. They all convey the action as a whole. They do not have an iterative force. With σπείραντι we see that this action is completed and then the enemy came and oversowed the wheat with weeds. That action too is viewed as a whole. Then events occur after that as well. So it is clear that the action of the man who sowed and his enemy were not presented as continuous events.

The illustration of the wheat and weeds seems to have a different setting than does that of the dragnet. With the wheat and weeds it begins when the "Son of man" is on earth and the effects of sowing and oversowing continues until the end. But the dragnet illustration seems to have its entire fulfillment at the "conclusion of the system of things." The fish are caught alive and brought onto the shore for sorting. If this began in the first century it would be difficult to see how fish that have died and do not exist would be sorted. It seems to only apply to those good and bad fish caught alive during the συντέλεια.





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Bobcat
Posts: 3353
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Re: Parables of Jesus

#68 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

Hi Tim,

You might see the dragnet parable a little differently if you see the 'sorting-of-the-fish' portion as starting at the end of the age, but as continuing throughout the Millennium. The wording allows for that view, that is, the sorting begins at "the end of the age." (That "the end of the age" or "the conclusion of the system of things" does NOT mean "the last days" can be seen from a comparison of Mt 13:30 with Mt 13:40-42 where the "end of the age" begins with the weeds being collected and burned "first." Also, "the last days", according to NT writers, begins at Jesus' first advent. Compare, for example, Heb 1:2. See also this post for additional on how NT writers viewed the "last days.")

Moreover, compare Acts 17:30-31 where Paul says that "all mankind, everywhere" were being called on to "repent" in connection with the good news that was being preached even then in the 1st century. (See here regarding Acts 17:30-32.) That would argue that the dragnet was already on its way to being dragged among all of humanity. And both the wheat & weeds parable and the dragnet have both good and bad associating with the good news, arguing for a similar time of application.

The parable of the dragnet starts with the illustrative part. The kingdom of the heavens is like:
1. A dragnet that pulls through the water catching fish of all sorts. (Mt 13:47)

2. When full, it is pulled on shore and the fish are sorted. (Mt 13:48)

In the application (Mt 13:49-50), Jesus picks up at point # 2 with the net already on shore and the angels separating the catch "at the end of the age."

The period in which the dragnet scours the sea can be seen as covering the entire range of the Christian era if one sees "the end of the age" to continue on into the Millennium. This application would include ones "caught" by the dragnet during the many centuries of the Christian era. It would also give meaning and purpose to the preaching of the disciples during the whole of the Christian era.


One other indication that the Wheat & Weeds parable and the Dragnet parable have a similar time frame of application is the fact that Matthew (or Jesus himself) has arranged what we now call chapter 13 into a chiasm or symmetry with these two parables in complimentary (i.e. symmetrical/chiastic) positions.

From Constable's Notes:
As elsewhere in Matthew, references to the kingdom indicate the future messianic (millennial) kingdom. However, Jesus taught some things here about the unseen growth and development of the kingdom in the inter-advent age that precede the establishment of that kingdom.

Matthew presented this discourse in a chiastic (crossing) structure,” New Testament Studies 25 (1979):516-22.

This structure is common in the Old Testament and in other Jewish writings. It enhances the unity of the discourse and focuses attention on the central element as what is most important. A diagram of this structure follows.

A. The introduction (Mt 13:1-2)

. . . B. The first parable to the crowds (Mt 13:3-9) (Sower)

. . . . . . C. An explanatory interlude: purpose and explanation (Mt 13:10-23)

. . . . . . . . . D. Three more parables to the crowd (Mt 13:24-33) (Wheat/Weeds, Mustard, Leaven)

. . . . . . . . . . . . E. An explanatory interlude: fulfillment and explanation (Mt 13:34-43)

. . . . . . . . . D^ Three parables to the disciples (Mt 13:44-48) (Treasure, Pearl, Dragnet)

. . . . . . C^ An explanatory interlude: explanation and response (Mt 13:49-51)

. . . B^ The last parable to the disciples (Mt 13:52) (Home Owner)

A^ The conclusion (Mt 13:53)

This structural analysis reveals that the discourse consists of two sections of four parables each, the first four to the multitudes and the last four to the disciples. In each section one parable stands out from the others. In the first group this is the first parable and in the second group it is the last one. The central section between the two groups of parables explains the function of the parables and explains one of them.
With regard to the Wheat and Weeds and the Dragnet, both occupy the complementary/symmetrical positions within the chiasm. Both elicit explanations from Jesus, whereas the two following the Wheat and Weeds do not. And the two preceding the Dragnet do not. All of the parables in chapter 13 appear to refer to circumstances within the entirety of the Christian era.

The Mustard Seed and Leaven parables appear to describe the kingdom from an overview position. Their counterparts, the Hidden Treasure and the Pearl of High Value present the kingdom from an individual viewpoint.

The Wheat & Weeds and the Dragnet present the Christian era both during and after the end of the age. In the Wheat and Weeds, note the allusion to Dan 12:1-3 in Mt 13:39-43. The corresponding part in the Dragnet parable would be the angels doing the separating work in Mt 13:49-50. The 'shining of the righteous ones' in Mt 13:43 is an allusion to Dan 12:3 which has the resurrection as its backdrop in Dan 12:2. Thus, the 'sorting' done by the angels in the Dragnet parable, as a parallel to Mt 13:43, has its background based in both the great tribulation and the period that follows. The parallel part of the Wheat and Weeds (Mt 13:43) would show that the wheat that will be involved in the 'sorting' during the Millennium.

During the current Christian era, the Wheat and Weeds parable shows how the good and bad came to 'grow together.' The parallel, the dragnet, it scoops up 'all kinds of fish.' The two parables are quite complementary of each other.

We could graph out the two parables that make up B & B^ and the six parables that make up D & D^ thusly:
B. Sower (Mt 13:3-9) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ┐

│ ┌ D1. Wheat and Weeds (Mt 13:24-30) . . .│ First 4 parables given to the crowds
│ │
│ │ ┌ D2. Mustard Seed (Mt 13:31-32) . . . . │
│ │ │
│ │ │ ┌ D3. 'Hidden' Leaven (Mt 13:33). . . .┘
│ │ │ │
│ │ │ └ D3^ Hidden Treasure (Mt 13:44). . .┐
│ │ │
│ │ └ D2^ Valuable Pearl (Mt 13:45-46). . . │ Last 4 parables given to the disciples
│ │
│ └ D1^ Dragnet (Mt 13:47-48). . . . . . . . . │

B^ Home Owner (Mt 13:52) . . . . . . . . . . ┘

The Leaven and the Hidden Treasure are linked by the things 'hidden.' The leaven is "hidden" in the dough, and the treasure is "hidden" in the field.

The Mustard Seed and the Pearl are related in both by the movement from small to great. The mustard seed becomes a 'great' vegetable, and the found pearl is of very 'great' value.

It does appear that there is a very deliberate structuring of the parables in Matthew 13. I'm going to have to look more at this. (Incidentally, I already have this chiasm posted here. But it deserves a lot more scrutiny.

But back to the point I was making. The chiastic structure here would argue that the dragnet parable portrays the Christian era in its entirety, just as its parallel (the wheat and the weeds) does. That would be my opinion, anyways.

(In referring to Jesus' first advent as the beginning of the last days, see this post and included links which shows Jesus first advent to be the very center point of the entire 7th rest day.)


Bobcat

Index to Parables


Edited to add:

I added the Sower and House Owner parables to my little ascii graphic above to see visually how they complement each other.

In the Sower, you have Jesus (at least at first) sowing kingdom seed. It affects some so that they 'sprout' and themselves become productive at varying levels.

On the complimentary side you have 'every instructor who has been well trained for the kingdom' bringing out 'things new and old', presumably, in his instructing others about the kingdom.

Bobcat
Posts: 3353
Joined: 7 years ago

Re: Parables of Jesus

#69 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

For completeness' sake, I added the parables of the Sower (Mt 13:3-9) and House Owner (Mt 13:52) to my little ascii graphic that charts out the chiastic relationship between the parables of Matthew 13 in the post above, just to see how they complement each other and so that the post above would be more complete.

I showed this to my wife last night. Besides the amazement at the symmetry of the chapter (which I share), she was also thinking the same thing I was about how this also serves as a memory aid.

There might be more to 'mine' or dig up from this. I know I am going to look over it in more detail.


Bobcat

Index to Parables

tslawson1
Posts: 51
Joined: 1 year ago

Re: Parables of Jesus

#70 Post by tslawson1 » 1 year ago

Bobcat,

In looking at the symmetry of the parables in your graph I notice a temporal progression in the order, a progression through history if you will.

Sowing —-The focus is on the conditions occurring in Jesus’ ministry at that time with no explicit mention of the Kingdom.

Wheat and Weeds —-Focus is on the beginning of the Kingdom and a continued work of sowing with the events of the consummation of the parousia presented as more remote. The parousia could include the 1,000 years and it was in fact viewed that way until the article Jesus’ Presence or Coming: Which?

Mustard Seed —- Focus is on the small beginning of the Kingdom in verse 31 and more remotely the full growth of the Kingdom in verse 32 with a linguistic connection to the Kingdom of God tree in Daniel 4.

The Woman and the Leven —-The temporal setting is not clearly defined and in the growth is mysterious, not seen but unstoppable. —- This could correspond to the dark times after the death of the apostles.

Hidden Treasure —- Darker times but the Kingdom can still be stumbled into.

Traveling Merchant —- Kingdom becoming more available for those seeking it. Time of enlightenment.

Dragnet —- Time of the consummation of the telos τελος.

House Holder —- Time of restoration, bring old things together with new. Possibly during the Millennium with the resurrection of the dead and reuniting with the living bringing the household back together

Bobcat, I got your PM but I can’t respond. I still don’t have authorization to do so on the forum.

Tim



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