Parables of Jesus

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Bobcat
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Re: Parables of Jesus

#81 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

Hi Emmett,
Hope that all made sense! Sorry for the long post...but you asked for details... :lol:

Yes, I did indeed. And thank you. And I have some searching to to see for myself.

Incidentally, you are 'immortalized' in the index for this thread. Anything else you post on this topic I'll add it to the index for easier reference. (See link below and under "Related" towards the bottom.) Thanks for the contribution. And I look forward to any additional posts on this topic (or other topics).


Bobcat

Index to Parables

Bobcat
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Re: Parables of Jesus

#82 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

In the NICNT-Matthew commentary (R. T. France), in the chapter describing Matthew 13, France gives a very interesting description of the Greek word παραβολή (parabolḗ) and its meaning and effect on people by Jesus' use of it (p. 502):

That Jesus "said many things in parables" might remind the reader of Solomon, who was compared with Jesus as recently as Mt 12:42, who spoke "three thousand proverbs (LXX parabolai)" (1Ki 4:32). We have already seen a number of parables in Jesus' teaching in Matthew (Mt 5:25-26; 9:12, 15-17; 11:16-19; 12:29, 43-45), but this is Matthew's first use of the term parabolḗ, whereas Mark also uses it earlier to describe the form of Jesus' response to the Beelzebul charge (Mk 3:23). It occurs throughout this chapter [Matthew 13], where the reference is to story-parables of the type normally associated with the English word "parable," and this is the predominant use elsewhere in Matthew (Mt 21:33, 45; 22:1), though it is also used for a simple comparison (Mt 24:32) and for a striking aphorism which involves no comparative element (Mt 15:15). That use indicates that for Matthew, as for Mark (cf. also Mark's inclusion of a series of aphorisms in his "parable" chapter, Mk 4:21-25), [the meaning of] parabolḗ is wider than the English "parable," and also includes cryptic sayings or epigrams, so that it is closer to the Hebrew māšāl (which it regularly translates in LXX), which covers proverbs (like those of Solomon), fables, prophetic utterances, and even riddles, as well as allegorical parables like those in Ezekiel. So understood, a parabolḗ is an utterance which does not carry its meaning on the surface, and which thus demands thought and perception if the hearer is to benefit from it. Learning from and responding to a parabolḗ is not a matter of simply reading off the meaning from the words, but of entering into an interactive process to which the hearer must contribute if true understanding is to result. That is why the same parable which enlightens one may puzzle or even repel another. A parable is not an easy option for understanding, but a challenge to which not everyone will be able to rise. Parables without interpretation, which is all that are offered to the crowds in this discourse [Matthew 13], will thus result in a divided response, depending on what degree of understanding and of openness each hearer brings to them. See further on Mt 13:11-13 for this understanding of parable.

Bobcat

Index to Parables

Stranger
Posts: 1947
Joined: 3 years ago

Re: Parables of Jesus

#83 Post by Stranger » 1 year ago

That was interesting Bobcat,

I was just watching a movie about twenty years ago and when I was reading what R.T. France said made me think of it.

Bobcat wrote:
1 year ago

R.T. Frances wrote:
but this is Matthew's first use of the term parabolḗ, whereas Mark also uses it earlier to describe the form of Jesus' response to the Beelzebul charge (Mk 3:23).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLCf_Muq9TU


Stranger

Bobcat
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Re: Parables of Jesus

#84 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

A post I made on another thread regarding the saying, "Where the corpse is, there the vultures will be also" (Mt 24:28; Lu 17:37): Here.

The discussion/debate about the saying actually starts at post # 269 (here).

I was linking the discussion to this thread for inclusion in the index. Post # 82 above (here) shows that the Greek word for parable can include difficult sayings.


Bobcat

Index to Parables

Bobcat
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Re: Parables of Jesus

#85 Post by Bobcat » 11 months ago

This post has some brief discussion of the parable of the minas in Lu 19:11-27. Look down in the post to the sub-title, Some verses that one might use to object.


Bobcat

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Bobcat
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Re: Parables of Jesus

#86 Post by Bobcat » 3 weeks ago

I wanted to link to an interesting write-up on the parable of the rich man and Lazarus: Here.

The writer of the linked article explores several possible parallel stories that were floating around in the 1st century. He also seems to think that the story might have some foundational connections with the patriarch Abraham and his servant Eliezer (which in Greek would be translated Lazarus).

Another couple of possible interesting points are these:
1) The parable's use of the word "bosom" (Greek κόλπος; Strong's 2859). This term is only found in the NT in the writings of Luke and the 4th gospel (aka Lazarus, if this thread has any merit). The word occurs only at: Lk 6:38; 16:22, 23; Jn 1:18; 13:23; Ac 27:39 in the NT.

This provides a possible, if faint, connection with the 4th gospel, although, the writer of the article makes no connection between Lazarus of the parable and the man Lazarus in the 4th gospel account. (But see this post for some interesting (possible) connection between the parable and the resurrection of Lazarus of Bethany.)


2) The writer of the article points out some similarities between the parable and the account of the Syrophoenician woman. (Mt 15:21-28; Mk 7:24-30) What makes this all the more interesting is that Luke does not include the account about the woman; Matthew and Mark do. So this opened up the possibility to the writer of the article that this parable might be Luke's replacement, for whatever reason, of the account about the woman.

Time wise, there does not appear to be a close connection between the account of the Syrophoenician woman and the rich man and Lazarus parable. The account about the woman occurs sometime after Passover of 32 CE (Spring-Early Summer, based on chart A7-D in the back of the NWT). The rich man and Lazarus parable is given sometime after the Festival of Dedication in 32 CE (December, based on chart A7-F). Maybe 6 months apart, give or take. In the context leading up to the parable it mentions the Pharisees being lovers of money. (Lu 16:14-18) Also, the account about the woman does not contain a foil such as the rich man was to Lazarus. So there does not appear to be any contextual or time connections between the story of the woman and the parable.

Bobcat

Index to Parables

Bobcat
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Re: Parables of Jesus

#87 Post by Bobcat » 1 week ago

Another very interesting analysis of the Rich man and Lazarus parable: Here. The blogger goes to great lengths to analyze the background and literary clues within the parable.


Bobcat

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