Chiastic Structure in the Book of Luke

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Bobcat
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Chiastic Structure in the Book of Luke

#1 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

There is much more on chiastic structures in Luke. But I wanted to reference a post that already catalogs this type of literary structure in Zechariah's prophetic prayer in Lu 1:68-79. Here.

Also see a literary structure comparison between the books of Luke and Acts in the 1st link in this post.


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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Luke

#2 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

This post has a comparison of the symmetrical structure in Luke 18:18-30 (the passage involving the rich young ruler) with its counterpart in both Matthew and Mark.


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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Luke

#3 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

This post has a comparison of the chiastic structure of the parable of the wedding banquet in Matthew 22:1-14 and the parable of the wedding banquet of Luke 14:7-24.


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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Luke

#4 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

In post # 1 above, i linked to a web page that compares the structure of Luke with Acts. What follows below is some reference material elucidating further on that topic. The material is copied from the introductory section of Constable's Notes. But it is actually comments from other writers:

Unique Features

Acts is the only New Testament book that continues the history begun in the Gospels. Whereas Luke’s Gospel focuses on the vertical universalization of the gospel (up and down the social scale), Acts focuses on its horizontal universalization (from Jerusalem to the uttermost parts of the world).
“. . . the Acts is to be seen in close literary association with the Gospel [of Luke]. They form two parts of one work, conceived in its final form as a unity, whether or not the original composition of the Gospel took place independently of the plan to produce the two-part work. Although there are other examples of literary compositions in two parts (Josephus, Contra Apionem, is one of the nearest parallels to Luke-Acts in time and cultural context), Luke’s work appears to be unique among Christian writings and to have no close secular precedents in its combination of the stories of a religious leader and of his followers.”
“The book which we call the Acts of the Apostles may be said to complete the Pentateuch of New Testament history. Four of these books present the Person of our Lord; while the fifth gives the first page of the history of the Church . . .”

Acts is also an indispensable historical record for understanding the Apostle Paul’s epistles; without it we could not understand some of the things he wrote. It is the only Bible book that records the historical transition from Judaism to Christianity. It provides basic information about and insight into the early church. And it challenges every modern Christian.

Richard Longenecker has shown that Luke’s method of writing history was in line with current historiography of his day. Ben Witherington observed that Luke-Acts is more typical of ancient Greek history writing than Roman (Latin). Others have argued that it is more like the Hebrew Scriptures than anything else.

The Gospel of Luke is the longest book in the New Testament, and Acts is the second longest.


Structure

Longenecker identified five phenomena about the structure of Acts that the reader needs to recognize to appreciate what Luke sought to communicate.
“1. It begins, like the [Third] Gospel, with an introductory section of distinctly Lukan cast dealing with the constitutive events of the Christian mission (Ac 1:1—2:41) before it sets forth the advances of the gospel ‘in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth’ (Ac 1:7).

“2. This introductory section is followed by what appears to be a thematic statement (Ac 2:42-47). This material, while often viewed as a summary of what precedes, most probably serves as the thesis paragraph for what follows.

“3. In his presentation of the advance of the Christian mission, Luke follows an essentially geographical outline that moves from Jerusalem (Ac 2:42—6:7), through Judea and Samaria (Ac 6:8—9:31), on into Palestine-Syria (Ac 9:32—12:24), then to the Gentiles in the eastern part of the Roman Empire (Ac 12:25—19:20), and finally culminates in Paul’s defenses and the entrance of the gospel into Rome (Ac 19:21—28:31).

“4. In his presentation, Luke deliberately sets up a number of parallels between the ministry of Peter in the first half of Acts and that of Paul in the last half. See Charles H. Talbert, Literary Patterns, Theological Themes, and the Genre of Luke-Acts, pp. 23-24. This book contains many tables of interesting parallels within Acts, within Luke, and between Luke and Acts.

“5. Luke includes six summary statements or ‘progress reports’ (Ac 6:7; 9:31; 12:24; 16:5; 19:20; 28:31), each of which seems to conclude its own ‘panel’ of material.

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Re: Chiastic Structure in Luke ─ Lu 8:26-39

#5 Post by Bobcat » 10 months ago

For a comparison of the literary structure of the Lukan account of the healing of the demoniac (Lu 8:26-39) with the parallel accounts in Mt 8:28-34 and Mk 5:1-20, see this post.


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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Luke

#6 Post by Bobcat » 1 month ago

For a discussion of the forty days in Acts 1:3-4 and whether Luke 24:1-53 can be made to harmonize with it, see this thread.


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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Luke

#7 Post by Bobcat » 3 weeks ago

For cross-linking purposes, here is a post on the topic of the comma in Lu 23:43. And here was a follow on post.

Sometimes I can't remember where I buried a post or even that I made a post about something. Cross-linking helps me put a finger on it.


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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Luke

#8 Post by Stranger » 3 weeks ago

Bobcat wrote:
3 weeks ago
For cross-linking purposes, here is a post on the topic of the comma in Lu 23:43. And here was a follow on post.

Sometimes I can't remember where I buried a post or even that I made a post about something. Cross-linking helps me put a finger on it.


Bobcat

Hi Bobcat,

You know I love my neighbors neighbor, and it is getting late in the evening, those nail driving hammers are getting loud at this hour.

Remember! there is no Cross work to do this time around, We have to get the rest we need now. Take it easy my brother.



Stranger, (Jn 20:27)

Bobcat
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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Luke

#9 Post by Bobcat » 3 weeks ago

Hi Stranger,
Take it easy my brother
"Twill do, twill do." (Not as wide as a barn, nor as deep as a well, but ...)


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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Luke

#10 Post by Bobcat » 5 days ago

For a discussion of Luke's genealogical listing in Luke chapter 3 in comparison with Matthew's see here.

I also have a couple of articles on Matthew's genealogy linked to in this post. (Or if you use Chrome, this link will take you directly to the line where the links are.)


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