Chiastic Structure in the Book of Daniel

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Chiastic Structure in the Book of Daniel

#1 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

This post shows the chiastic structure that overlays the Aramaic portion of the book of Daniel. It can be found under the sub-title, Factors Linking Daniel 2 & 7 Together.


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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Daniel

#2 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

Here is a breakdown of the symmetry in the book of Daniel as described in David A. Dorsey's The Literary Structure of the Old Testament (p. 260, figure 26.2):

Symmetry in the Book of Daniel


Hebrew introduction: Daniel and his 3 friends in the king's training (Dan 1)


Aramaic Section (Dan 2-7)
. . . A. Vision of the four kingdoms (in human image), followed by God's kingdom. (Dan 2)

. . . . . . B. Martyr story: God saves Daniel's three friends in the fiery furnace. (Dan 3)

. . . . . . . . . C. Nebuchadnezzar's pride and Yahweh's sovereignty. (Dan 4) . . ┐
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - DUAL CENTER or PIVOT POINT
. . . . . . . . . C^ Belshazzar's pride and Yahweh's sovereignty. (Dan 5) . . . . . . ┘

. . . . . . B^ Martyr story: God saves Daniel in the lion's den. (Dan 6)

. . . A^ Vision of the four kingdoms (in images of beasts), kingdom given to "Son of Man" & "holy ones". (Dan 7)

Hebrew Section (Dan 8-12)
. . . A. Vision of two kingdoms (Persia and Greece; metaphor of beasts) (Dan 8)

. . . . . . B. Vision of seventy "sevens" leading to Messiah and a "coming prince" (Dan 9) . . CENTER or PIVOT POINT

. . . A^ Vision of two kingdoms (Persia and Greece; metaphor of man) (Dan 10-12)

Some points of note in the above symmetries:
1. The chiastic/symmetrical structure of each section (Aramaic & Hebrew) suggests that each section has some unified theme to it. The center section of each (Chapters 4 & 5 of the Aramaic portion; chapter 9 of the Hebrew portion) would be the portion most likely to be the section that the related chapters are supporting.

2. Carrying point "1" a little further, The pivot section of the Aramaic chiasm deals with gentile rulership. The pivot section of the Hebrew chiasm deals with "Messiah the Leader." It is not hard to imagine that these two pivot sections are drawing on the oppositional relationship between "the seed of the woman" of Gen 3:15. and his sworn enemy, "the serpent," who also gets a grant of rulership from God. (Lu 4:5-6) But his grant is only for the purpose of proving he is unable, that is, only "the Most High" is able to rule mankind. (Dan 4:17)

3. Notice how "A"and "A^ " in the Aramaic section have a relationship with "A" and "A^ " in the Hebrew section. Both discuss details to take place among Gentile kingdoms.

4. Thematically, A & A^ in the Hebrew section represent a slice in time (Persia & Greece) from A & A^ in the Aramaic section (Babylon thru Rome).

5. Also they both make use of the human/beast metaphor. Only the order is reversed in the Hebrew chiasm compared with the Aramaic chiasm. This could be another clue that the Aramaic chiasm (chapters 2 thru 7) has a relationship with the Hebrew chiasm in chapters 8 thru 12. Compare also the purpose given at Dan 4:17. It sets Nebuchadnezzar in contrast to God's purpose to raise up "the lowliest one of mankind as the ultimate ruler of humanity. This also would link the Aramaic pivot section on Gentile rulership with the Messianic pivot section in the Hebrew chiasm. They represent diametrically opposed rulerships.

6. Notice how C & C^ (the center/pivot section) in the Aramaic chiasm are similar, but not merely repeats of each other. In chapter 4, Nebuchadnezzar expresses his pride and is judged with a period of "seven times" that follow until something is proved. Belshazzar, on the other hand, has proved to be a failure and gets judged and done away with "that night." So the dual center or pivot parts of the Aramaic chiasm are not merely mirror images of each other, but are complimentary. The "C" part (regarding Nebuchadnezzar) represents a beginning or start, and the "C^ " part (regarding Belshazzar) represents an ending or finish point.

7. Similarly, the two martyr sections (B & B^ in the Aramaic chiasm), although very similar (for which see the chiasm shown below), they also have their differences. In chapter three Nebuchadnezzar was determined to persecute the three Hebrews, indeed, anyone who got in the way of what he wanted. In contrast, Darius in chapter 6 is described as wanting what was best for his kingdom, and was determined to make Daniel the second greatest. He also tried to prevent Daniel from being persecuted, but was bound by law to allow it. Thus, Nebuchadnezzar and Darius are presented in those two chapters as virtual polar opposites.

8. Note the differences between A & A^ in the Aramaic chiasm or symmetry. The four metals of chapter 2 are generally acknowledged to represent Babylon, Medo-Persia, Greece and Rome. Similarly, the four beasts that emerge in chapter 4 are also recognized by most scholars to be Babylon, Medo-Persia, Greece and Rome. But there are also interesting differences.

The four metals of chapter 2, although representing different kingdoms, are also progressive segments of the bigger image that they are a part of, indicating that they, collectively, represent a greater unity or organization of some type.

The four metals are shown to be progressively degrading in quality, leading up to a division in the kingdom. If the division at the end of the vision is the final part of the progressive degradation, then, the vision is indicating a progressive loss of ruling control leading to a fatal (if you will) loss of control as represented by the 'division in the kingdom.' (Compare Mt 12:25-26)

The four beasts of chapter 7 are presented as progressively more powerful and aggressive. Thus, if they are the same as in chapter 2, the degradation in chapter 2 does not involve military power.

Chapter 2 does not refer to a fifth kingdom; only to four, followed by a divided kingdom. Chapter 7 refers to fours beasts that emerge, and then the emergence of ten horns on the back of the fourth, followed by an eleventh horn that does gain rulership that puts it on a par with the four beasts that precede it. (Compare Dan 7:11-12, 25-26; Regarding the 10 horns, and the fact that they do not gain ruling authority like the eleventh, compare Rev 17:12.) What makes this curious is that the eleventh horn occupies that last part of the vision in chapter 7 and is described as 'having eyes like that of a man.' The last part of the vision in chapter 2 has a 'divided kingdom' that includes the 'mixing in of mankind.' (Dan 2:43) One could say that the emergence of the eleventh horn as a ruling authority is what constitutes the division in the kingdom.

9. The A & A^ sections of the Hebrew chiasm frame the center section on the first advent of 'Messiah the leader.' Numerous references going back to Josephus and even further back have understood the small horn of Dan 8:9-14 to refer to Antiochus IV Epiphanes. Similarly, Dan 11:21-35 has also been seen to have found fulfillment in Antiochus IV. From the view of their position in the symmetry (being at parallel points in the symmetry), this would also make sense that they complement each other in some way. At the same time, the fact that they frame chapter 9 on the Messiah would indicate that A & A^ have some relationship with chapter 9. And thus, Jesus words at Mt 24:15 (borrowing from both Daniel 8 & 12) establish that fact.

In chapter 11, after the section describing Antiochus (Dan 11:21-35), there is a description of another mysterious king. (Dan 11:36-45) The Hebrew chiasm/symmetry might, itself, suggest that this mystery king is also (at least initially) Nero, the "coming prince" who will "destroy the city and the sanctuary." (Dan 9:26; See the link below on The Final King of the North).


The book (mentioned above) makes an interesting comment (p. 259) about the two martyr chapters (Dan 3, 6):
It is interesting to note that an almost identical structural design is used in the two martyr stories in chapters 3 and 6:
. . . A. Introduction

. . . . . . B. Plot by enemies to kill martyrs by attacking martyr's loyalty to God.

. . . . . . . . . C. Martyrs remain faithful; are thrown to their probable deaths; king's distress.

. . . . . . . . . . . . D. The miracle: they are unharmed.

. . . . . . . . . C^ Martyrs come unhurt out of structure into which they were thrown; king's delight.

. . . . . . B^ Revenge on enemies: they are killed in the very way they plotted to kill martyrs

. . . A^ Conclusion: martyrs are honored and promoted.

This portion on the martyr chapters (3 & 6) was described in the book as a sequential list of 7 items (numbered 1 thru 7). After some reflection, I (Bobcat) noticed that this listing also displayed a symmetrical structure. So I formatted the list to reflect that. But the wording of the list is the same as how David Dorsey had them in his book.


Here are some threads I started related specifically to the book of Daniel:

Kingdoms of Daniel 2 & 7 (Daniel chapters 2 & 7)

Gentile Times . . . Reconsidered (Daniel chapter 4)

The Final King of the North (Daniel chapters 11 & 12)

The Little Horn of Dan 7:25, 26 & the 3 ½ Times

This post has links to other posts in that thread related to the "2300 evenings and mornings" of Dan 8:13-14, the "time and times and half a time" of Dan 12:7, and the 1290 & 1335 days of Dan 12:11-12. The links are the last four links in that post.

This post shows how Daniel's prayer in Dan 9 helps identify the end point of the prophecy of Ezekiel chapter 4 with the 390 & 40 days.

This PDF (not mine) does a literary/numerical analysis of the book of Daniel. I'm not sure of the usefulness (yet), but it is good to have it catalogued here for possible future reference.


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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Daniel

#3 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

I did a little editing/refinement of the post above that reflects further study. I have more, but that's it for now.

Given the fact that Daniel wrote the book over a period of maybe 70 years, the symmetry displayed in the book of Daniel is itself (IMO), an evidence of a divine hand in its writing. I am finding that the symmetrical/chiastic structure also serves as a great memory aid. With this chiastic structure in mind, the whole book begins to take on a unified appearance (similar also with other Bible books).


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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Daniel

#4 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

Adding some references as to why I said the "small horn" of Dan 8:9-14 refers, initially at least, to Antiochus IV Epiphanes.


From footnote 28 at Dan 8:9 in the NET Bible:
This small horn is Antiochus IV Epiphanes, who controlled the Seleucid kingdom from ca. 175-164 b.c. Antiochus was extremely hostile toward the Jews and persecuted them mercilessly. [Notice, no attempt to even explain why, as is often done in other footnotes in the NET. This is because of how the NET feels about the certainty of the choice based on historical commentary on the subject. - Bobcat]

From Constable's Notes on Dan 8:9
THE LITTLE HORN ON THE GOAT Dan 8:9-14

Dan 8:9 Daniel next saw a rather small horn (king, Dan 8:23) grow out of one of the four horns (kingdoms, Dan 8:22) that had replaced the single horn (the first king, Alexander, Dan 8:21) on the goat (Greece, Dan 8:21). This horn is quite clearly different from the little horn that came up among the 10 horns on the fourth beast in the previous vision (cf. Dan 7:8, 11, 24-26). . .

This little horn grew very great to the south, the east, and “the beautiful.” The first problem with this description is what is the reference point for these directions? History has identified this little horn as Antiochus IV (Epiphanes), the eighth king of the Seleucid dynasty. He ruled Syria from 175 to 164 B.C. (cf. 1 Macc. 1:10; 6:16), and he conducted military campaigns in all of these directions (cf. 1 Macc. 1:20). Therefore the point of reference must be Syria.

The second problem is the identification of “the beautiful.” This is quite evidently a reference to Palestine (cf. Dan 11:16, 41, 45; Jer. 3:19; Ezek. 20:6, 15). Here the vision begins to focus on the future of Israel and the Jews. Antiochus was especially vengeful against the Jews whom he persecuted brutally.

From Barne's Notes on the OT regarding Daniel chapter 8:
This is one of the few prophecies in the Scriptures that are explained to the prophets themselves, and it becomes, therefore, important as a key to explain other prophecies of a similar character. Of the reference to the kingdom of Media and Persia, and to the kingdom of Greece, there is an express statement. The application of a portion of the prophecy to Alexander the Great, and to the four monarchies into which his kingdom was divided at his death, is equally certain. And there can be as little doubt of the application of the remainder to Antiochus Epiptianes, and in this, nearly all expositors are agreed. Indeed, so striking and clear is the application to this series of historical events, that Porphyry maintained that this, as well as other portions of Daniel, were written after the events occurred. One of two things, indeed, is certain - either that this was written after the events here referred to occurred, or that Daniel was inspired. No man by any natural sagacity could have predicted these events with so much accuracy and particularity. . .

Dan 8:9 And out of one of them came forth a little horn, which waxed exceeding great, toward the south, and toward the east, and toward the pleasant land.

And out of one of them, came forth a little horn - Emblematic of new power that should spring up. Compare the notes at Daniel 7:8. This little horn sprang, up out of one of the others; it did not spring up in the midst of the others as the little horn, in Daniel 7:8, did among the ten others. This seemed to grow out of one of the four, and the meaning cannot be misunderstood. From one of the four powers or kingdoms into which the empire of Alexander would be divided, there would spring up this ambitions and persecuting power.

Which waxed exceeding great - Which became exceedingly powerful. It was comparatively small at first, but ultimately became mighty. There can be no doubt that Antiochus Epiphanes is denoted here. All the circumstances of the prediction find a fulfillment in him; and if it were supposed that this was written after he had lived, and that it was the design of the writer to describe him by this symbol, he could not have found a symbol that would have been more striking or appropriate than this. The Syriac version has inserted here, in the Syriae text, the words "Antiochus Epiphanes," and almost without exception expositors have been agreed in the opinion that he is referred to.

From the Keil & Delitzsch OT Commentary on Daniel 8:9
The one of the four horns from which the little horn grew up is the Syrian monarchy, and the horn growing up out of it is the king Antiochus Epiphanes, as Josephus (Ant. x. 11. 7) and all interpreters acknowledge, on the ground of 1 Macc. 1:10. The south, against which he became great, is Egypt (cf. Daniel 11:5 and 1 Macc. 1:16ff.). The east is not Asia (Kranichfeld), but Babylon, and particularly Elymas and Armenia, 1 Macc. 1:31, 37; 3:31, 37; 6:1-4, according to which he subdued Elymas and overcame Artaxias, king of Armenia (App. Syr. c. 45, 46; Polyb. xxxi. 11). Besides the south and the east, Canaan, the holy land, as lying between, is named as the third land, as in Isaiah 19:23. it is named as third, between Egypt and Assyria; but הצּבי ואל ("and toward the glorious land") is not, with Kranichfeld, to be regarded as an exegetical addition to המּזרח ואל ("and toward the east"). Palestine lay neither to the east of Daniel, nor geographically to the east of the kingdom denoted by the little horn, because the text gives no support to the identifying of this kingdom with the Javanic, the horn operating from the west.

The K&D commentary gives some attention also to the modern idea that this part of Daniel was written after the fact:
(Note: According to the modern critics (Berth., v. Leng., Hitz., Bleek), this chapter must have been written shortly before the re-consecration of the temple, or immediately thereafter, before or immediately after the death of Antiochus Epiphanes. This supposition is drawn from Daniel 8:14, according to which the period of oppression shall continue 2300 evening-mornings. But, overlooking the circumstance that these critics cannot agree as to the reckoning of this period of time, and thus announce the uncertainty of their hypothesis, the whole of the other contents of the chapter stand in contradiction to this supposition. It contains no hint whatever of the great victories of the Maccabees which preceded the consecration of the temple, and first made it possible, but, on the contrary, speaks of the oppression as continuing unchanged till the oppressor is himself destroyed (Daniel 8:25), and then it breaks off without any Messianic view, as one should expect from a parenetic poem of a Maccabean Jews; so that Bleek finds himself compelled from his own resources to add "the intimation, that the beginning of the deliverance destined by God for His people is closely and immediately joined to the discontinuance of the worship of Jehovah by Antioch. Epiph., and to the destruction of this prince," in order to give to the vision "a Messianic character.")

My purpose in presenting these references (and I could have added many more) was/is to show the historicalness of the fulfillment of the prophecy in Antiochus IV Epiphanes. This is not to say that there wasn't a possible future fulfillment of the prophecy in someone else. Indeed, Jesus words at Matthew 24:15 would indicate that he saw the prophecy also having fulfillment in the first century (for which see some of the links provided at the bottom of post # 2 in this thread, and particularly this post).

But now, added to this is the chiastic/symmetrical structure of Dan 8 thru 12 (as shown here in post # 2 above) that would, by itself, also argue for a relationship between the prophecies of Daniel 8 & 10-12 and the Messianic prophecy of Daniel 9.

For the possibility of yet another fulfillment future from the first century, see this post. It should be noted that I still have more to add to that thread. Additional research on the subject required me to put a hold to the major thrust of the topic for the time being. But see also the chart here which shows similarities between Daniel, 1st century events and Revelation which also suggests a fulfillment future from the 1st century.

Amazingly, despite all the centuries of scholarly opinion about Antiochus IV Epiphanes and Daniel 8:9, the WT's Daniel's Prophecy book (pp. 170-173) makes no mention of him in their interpretation of Daniel 8:9. Not even a rebuttal in support of their own view! They simply ignore all that. Apparently, much of their commentary depends on the assumption that their audience will not consult other references.

(Regarding the king described in Dan 11:21-35. and his being matched historically with Antiochus IV Epiphanes, see this post, under the sub-title, A Final King of the North and included links.)


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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Daniel

#5 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

What follows is reference material regarding the identification of the king referred to at Dan 11:21-35. As you will see, these references are all in agreement that the king described in Dan 11:21-35 is Antiochus IV Epiphanes. And they represent a majority opinion.

One of the reasons for citing these references is to show that the historical viewpoint of the identification of this king is the same as the identification of the king described in Daniel 8:9-14. They are the same. Only the level of detail differs. This identification also matches the fact that Daniel chapter 8 & 10-12 are at matching points in the Hebrew language chiasm/symmetry presented above for Daniel chapters 8 thru 12. Based on that chiastic structure, it would be expected that Dan 8 & 10-12 would be related in some way. The intention here is not to rule out some possible further application, but to show that historically the prophecy was seen to be fulfilled in Antiochus IV.


This is footnote # 52 in the NET Bible at Daniel 11:21
This despicable person to whom the royal honor has not been rightfully conferred is Antiochus IV Epiphanes (ca. 175-164 b.c.).

(Note how the majority opinion is so historically consistent that the NET footnote does not even bother to list any contrary views.)


Here is Constable's Notes description of the king being described at Dan 11:21ff
The Seleucid king who succeeded Seleucus IV was the younger son of Antiochus III, namely, Antiochus IV Epiphanes (“Illustrious One,” 175-164 B.C.). Antiochus IV took the name “Epiphanes” upon himself. As mentioned previously, he linked “Epiphanes” with “Theos” on coins that he minted and so claimed to be “God manifest.” However, he proved so untrustworthy that many people made a play on his name and called him “Epimanes” (“Madman”). The throne rightly belonged to one of the sons of Seleucus IV, the former king and brother of Antiochus IV, but Antiochus IV seized it for himself and had himself proclaimed king. He persuaded the leaders of Syria to allow him to rule since Demetrius, the eldest son of Seleucus IV, was being held hostage in Rome. In this way, through intrigue, he secured the throne for himself.

Barne's Notes on the OT has some extensive commentary on Dan 11:21 -
And in his estate shall stand up a vile person, to whom they shall not give the honour of the kingdom: but he shall come in peaceably, and obtain the kingdom by flatteries.

And in his estate - In his place. See the notes at Daniel 11:7, Daniel 11:20.

Shall stand up a vile person - There shall succeed to the throne. The reference here is to Antiochus Epiphanes, who reigned from 175 b.c. to 163 b.c. The epithet "vile" here given him was one which his subsequent history showed was eminently appropriate to him in all respects, as a man and as a prince. The Hebrew word rendered "vile" - נבזה nı̂bezeh - properly means one despised or held in contempt, Isaiah 49:7; Psalm 22:6 (7). The meaning here is, that he was one who deserved to be despised, and who would be held in contempt - a man of a low, base, contemptible character. Vulgate, "despectus;" Greek ἐξουδενώθη exoudenōthē; Luther, "ein ungeachteter." Never were terms better applied to a man than these to Antiochus Epiphanes - both before and after his ascension to the throne. The manner of his seizing upon the crown is stated above. He was surnamed Epiphanes (Ἐπιφανής Epiphanēs), "the Illustrious," because, if we believe Appian, he vindicated the claims of the royal family against the usurpations of the foreigner Heliodorus. He also bore the name Θεός Theos, "God," which is still seen upon his coins.

But by his subjects he was called Epimanes (Ἐπιμανής Epimanēs) "the Insane," instead of "Epiphanes" - a name which he much more richly deserved. The following statement from Jahn (Heb. Commonwealth, ch. x. Section 92) will show with what propriety the term "vile" was applied to him: "He often lounged like a mere idler about the streets of Antioch, attended by two or three servants, and not deigning to look at the nobles; would talk with goldsmiths and other mechanics in their workshops, engage in idle and trifling conversation with the lowest of the people, and mingle in the society of foreigners and men of the vilest character. He was not ashamed to go into the dissipated circles of the young, to drink and carouse with them, and to assist their merriment by singing songs and playing on his flute. He often appeared in the public baths among the common people, engaging in every kind of foolish jest, without the least regard to the dignity of his station and character. Not unfrequently he was seen drunk in the streets, when he would throw his money. about, and practice various other fooleries equally extravagant. He would parade the streets of his capital in a long robe, and with a garland of roses upon his head: and if any attempted to pass by or to follow him, he would pelt them with stones, which he carried concealed under his garments," etc. See also Appian in "Syriacis," 45:70-75; Eusebius in "Chronicon;" Athenaeus, lib. v. p. 193; x. p. 438; Livy, xli. 20; Diod. Sic. "Frag." xxvi. 65; xxxi. 7, 8; Prideaux, "Con." iii.-212-214; 1 Macc. 1:9.

To whom they shall not give the honor of the kingdom - That is, the people. Or, in other words, it should not be conferred on him by any law or act of the nation, or in any regular succession or claim. The true heir to the crown was Demetrius, who was absent at Rome. On him the crown would have regularly devolved; but in his absence it was obtained by Antiochus by arts which he practiced, and not by any voluntary grant of the nation.

But he shall come in peaceably - Quietly; without war or force; by art rather than by arms. Gesenius (Lexicon) renders the phrase used here "in the midst of security;" that is, unexpectedly, suddenly. The idea seems to be, that he would do it when the nation was not expecting it, or apprehending it; when they would be taken off their guard, and he would "steal a march upon them." All this accorded with fact. The nation seemed not to have anticipated that Antiochus would attempt to ascend the throne on the death of his brother. But he quietly left Rome - while Demetrius, his nephew, the true heir to the crown, remained there; came to Athens, and learned what was the state of things in Syria, where Heliodorus had usurped the authority; made an agreement with the king of Pergamos to aid him, and, by the assistance of a part of the Syrians who were opposed to the usurper Heliodorus, deprived him of the authority, and himself took possession of the crown. No one seemed to suspect that this was his aim, or to doubt that his object was to remove an usurper that his nephew might be placed on the throne.

And obtain the kingdom by flatteries - חלקלקות chălaqelaqqôth - "lubricitates, blanditioe." "The word," says Elliott (Rev. iv. 133), "has a double sense, being applied both to the slipperiness of a path, and the slipperiness or flattering and deceit of the tongue." In the former sense it occurs in Psalm 35:6, "Let their way be dark and slippery;" in the latter, its originating verb, Proverbs 2:16; Proverbs 7:5, "The stranger that flattereth or dissembleth with his words;" and Proverbs 29:5, "A man that flattereth (or dissembleth to) his neighbor." In this latter sense the verbal seems to be used both here and in the verses Daniel 11:32, Daniel 11:34 below: "arts of dissimulation." - Gesenius. The probable meaning here is, that he would obtain the throne by acts of dissembling, and by promises of rewards and offices. Such promises he would probably make to Eumenes, king of Pergamos, and to the Syrian nobles and people who espoused his cause. It would not be difficult to secure the aid of multitudes in this way, and the character of Antiochus was just such as to permit him to use any of these arts to accomplish his ends. Perhaps, also, he might hold out the hope of aid from the Romans, with whom he had long lived. It was no uncommon thing for an usurper to make his way by flattering certain classes of a people, and by promises of largesses, of offices, and of the removal of oppressive burdens. Compare Prideaux, "Con." iii. 212. See also the case of Absalom in 2 Samuel 15:1-6.

This page at BibleHub has an additional sampling of commentaries that all identify the king of Daniel 11:21 as Antiochus IV Epiphanes. The identification is so historically secure that none of the commentaries give any attention to dissenting views. (See also here.)

Again, none of this is intended to rule out a possible future fulfillment, but rather, to show how solid is the historical identification of the king of Daniel 11:21 as Antiochus IV.


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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Daniel

#6 Post by Bobcat » 1 year ago

An interesting PDF on the use of the phrase, "Son of Man" in the NT: Here.

The PDF comes from the Christadelphian eJournal website (which can be found here; their facebook page here). It (the PDF) is more centered on an analysis of the phrase, "Son of Man" in the NT. But my purpose for putting it here was some comments in the PDF starting at page 5 in reference to Antiochus IV Epiphanes and Rome in connection with Dan 9:27.

I'll also put a link in another thread discussing Jesus' use of "Son of Man" terminology for anyone who might be interested in the PDF there.


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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Daniel

#7 Post by Stranger » 8 months ago

Hi Bobcat,

Here's a link I'm posting. I'm not sure if you have made mention of this one concerning the chiasmus of chapter 2 and 7.

(under the composition and structure heading)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_4# ... _structure.


"Stay down under the tree line you might be alright"

"There's no such thing as an easy run,
those busch league pilots... they just cant get the job done"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=opBe5z0qwRE


Stranger, (Dan 4:12)

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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Daniel

#8 Post by Bobcat » 8 months ago

Hi Stranger,

Hope you are doing well and keeping safe.

Thank you for the link. I hope you don't mind that I adjusted the link so that it goes straight to the composition section on the page. If you prefer the link to go back to the top of the page I will restore it.

I am also looking for a strategic place to put that link in the Gentile Times . . . Reconsidered thread (here), since that thread is specifically aimed at Dan 4.

Notice how in the chiasm in the link that Dan 2 is described as, "four kingdoms replaced by a fifth." Dan 7 is also described the same way. But see note # 8 in this post (above) that describes subtle comparative differences between Daniel chapter 2 and 7.

Many make the mistake of reading a fifth gentile kingdom into Daniel 2 and then thinking that the division refers to some circumstances within that fifth gentile kingdom (such as labor unions, etc). This is how the WT interprets Dan 2.

Dan 7 does have a fifth gentile kingdom. It is the 11th horn that grows out of the fourth beast. That horn is said to have a ruling authority like the first four beasts. (Dan 7:11, 12, 24-26) The comparison with chapter 2 would place the 5th kingdom of chapter 7 (the 11th horn) as the reason or cause of the "division" of the kingdom in chapter 2. Chapter 2 has each of the four gentile kingdoms as part of a larger unified image. (Dan 2:31-33) If one sees Satan as the ruler of the individual metallic kingdoms in the image of Dan 2, then, his rulership progressively develops a weakness (indicated by the declining value of the metals), leading up to when "the kingdom" becomes "divided." The "divided" condition represents a fatal flaw in "the kingdom." (Compare Mt 12:25-26) Chapter 7 shows the reason for this divided condition. It is the 11th horn itself that "has eyes like a man's." (Dan 7:8; See also this post. And compare with this post also.)


Bobcat

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Stranger
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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Daniel

#9 Post by Stranger » 8 months ago

Bobcat wrote:
8 months ago
Hi Stranger,

Hope you are doing well and keeping safe.

Thank you for the link. I hope you don't mind that I adjusted the link so that it goes straight to the composition section on the page. If you prefer the link to go back to the top of the page I will restore it.
I'm doing well thank you, and keeping as safe as God allows me to, but I must admit that sometimes I feel like a daredevil.

I'm pleased with the adjustment you made, it's the way I wanted it, but I'm not that experienced with all these buttons and clicks, I might as well be eating creme brulee with chopsticks.

I knew you would be right on top of it.

Great post BTW, you always amaze me with your knowledge and skill.


Stranger, (Dan 9:22 KJV)

Bobcat
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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Book of Daniel

#10 Post by Bobcat » 3 weeks ago

Here is a link to a thread discussion on Daniel 8 thru 12 on Reddit AcademicBiblical forum. I wanted to catalog it for further analysis as to whether Daniel 9 might have had an initial fulfillment in the Maccabean period (aka Antiochus IV Epiphanes time frame).

Even if it did, Jesus' comments at Mt 24:15 would show that he saw further fulfillment in his time. But we'll see. I am not sold yet on an initial Maccabean time fulfillment for Daniel chapter 9. The idea, at this point (for me), has a lot of anomalies.

Post # 2 above shows that the chiastic structure of Daniel does favor a close relationship between Daniel chapters 8 & 10-12 with 9.


Bobcat

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