Chiastic Structure in the Bible

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Bobcat
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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Bible

#11 Post by Bobcat » 2 years ago

Matthew thru Galatians (Note: Not all are available yet.)

Matthew

Mark

Luke

John

Acts

Romans

1 Corinthians

2 Corinthians

Galatians

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Bobcat
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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Bible

#12 Post by Bobcat » 2 years ago

Ephesians thru Philemon (Note: Not all are available yet.)

Ephesians

Philippians

Colossians

1 Thessalonians

2 Thessalonians

1 Timothy

2 Timothy

Titus

Philemon

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Bobcat
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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Bible

#13 Post by Bobcat » 2 years ago

Hebrews thru Revelation (Note: Not all are available yet.)

Hebrews

James

1 Peter

2 Peter

1 John, 2 John, 3 John

Jude

Revelation

In the thread on Revelation there also appears (to me anyways) to be some evidence of sub-chiastic structure, or chiasmus within chiasmus (e.g. here).

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Bobcat
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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Bible

#14 Post by Bobcat » 2 years ago

Is it possible that there is a chiastic structure to the events of the entire 7th day? If God and Christ are in control of history, that would seem to be a possibility. (See also here regarding God & Christ controlling history.)

This is an experimental post. Not sure where or what it will lead to. (See also here which is an expansion on this post.)

A. All is as it should be (Adam & Eve before sin)

. . .B. Pre-flood era to before flood (Mankind descends, angels tested; See here & cmp. note #2.)

. . . . . .C. Flood of Noah's day. (Great destruction of antediluvian world.)

. . . . . . . . .D. (Roughly 2200 years of patriarchal/natural Israel history.)

. . . . . . . . . . . .Breaks down to about: 200 years from the flood to tower of babel
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500 years of patriarchs (following tower of babel incident - De 32:7-9)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1500 years of Israel as nation (c. 1447/46 BCE to 33 CE


. . . . . . . . . . . .E. I am thinking that Christ's 1st advent might be the pivot or center point.


. . . . . . . . .D^ Roughly 2000 years of spiritual Israel history (33 CE to present)

. . . . . .C^ Christ's 2nd advent. (Great destruction of old order.)

. . .B^ Millennium and post Millennium test of humans (Mankind restored, humans tested)

A^ All is restored to how it should be.

Just 'roughing' in possibilities. I'll add and delete as needed. Any thoughts on the topic are welcome.

Tentatively, it appears that there is a general chiastic pattern, but only up to a point. As you get more detailed the symmetry begins to break down. Maybe that is to be expected, that is, one wouldn't let the idea of a pattern take precedence over what needs to be done.

See this post for possible corrections to the post-flood timeline. These changes would change some of the figures used in the chiasm above.


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AmosAu2
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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Bible

#15 Post by AmosAu2 » 2 years ago

Hi Bobcat,

That's an interesting thought about the world events & history.

You might like to check out the Book of Enoch, "Ten week Prophecy." It gives an exact history of the world in advance. You might also like to check the "Parable of the Animals", in Book of Enoch. I'd suggest that they're related.

Regards, Amos.

Bobcat
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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Bible

#16 Post by Bobcat » 2 years ago

An interesting comparison between Luke and Acts: Here.

And . . .

A PDF: Quantitative Evaluation Method for a Literary Structure Hypothesis Within the Bible. (Hajime Murai, 24 pages)


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Bobcat
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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Bible

#17 Post by Bobcat » 2 years ago

Here is an interesting PDF entitled, Numerical Secrets of the Bible (Casper Labuschagne). It is presented in 7 individual PDFs from his website. (Home page here.)


See also this post (by goghtherefore - thanks!) which has a link to "interesting numerical patterns" in the Bible.


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Bobcat
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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Bible

#18 Post by Bobcat » 2 years ago

One poster had this to say about chiasmus:
I’m sorry, this chiasmus theory too, is just trying to squeeze someone’s pet theory into reality, not unlike Russell’s Pyramidology . . . Over complication : this chiasmus theory , it holds no weight at all in my view.

What follows is part of the introduction of David Dorsey's, The Literary Structure of the Old Testament. It helps explain some of the difference in style between modern Western writings and ancient Hebrew writings such as are found in the Old Testament.

Introduction

All literary compositions have structure. A book, a personal letter, a sermon, even a recipe, has an internal arrangement, sometimes referred to as "surface structure." A typical sermon, for example, may be organized into three parts: Introduction, body of three points, and conclusion. A sermon would not be appreciated or understandable if it simply consisted of hundreds of unrelated statements, one after another without any discernible order. The practice of structuring communication, whether written or oral, is universal among humans, as shown by studies among numerous languages and dialects throughout the world. Humans need and appreciate communication that is arranged and organized.

This was true in ancient Israel. The pages of the Old Testament reflect a keen interest in literary structure. Hebrew authors and editors generally took great pains to arrange their compositions in ways that would help convey their messages.

The purpose of the present work is twofold: (1) to study the internal structures of each of the books of the Old Testament and (2 to consider the relationship between each book's structure and its meaning and message.


The Difficulty of Studying Literary Structure

Analyzing the structures of Old Testament books is difficult for two reasons. First, the Hebrew authors used no visual, graphic structure markers to help readers to follow their organization. The original manuscripts of their compositions, like most written works from ancient times, probably contained few, if any, graphic indicators of their organization. The chapter and verse divisions in the Old Testament were added centuries after the Old Testament books were written. In contrast to modern Bibles, the text of ancient Hebrew manuscripts generally ran on and on without break, filling column after column from top to bottom and side to side, without set-off titles, subtitles, indentations, or any other visual structure indicators.

Modern readers are unaccustomed to such lack of visual helps. In modern texts an array of graphic techniques make an author's organizational intentions clear. As H. Van Dyke Parunak observes:
Graphical signals bombard the reader of a book in modern western culture. Italics or underlining highlight words and phrases of special importance, while parentheses, footnotes, and appendices remove peripheral material from the direct course of the writer's argument. Chapter headings, section titles, and paragraph indentations divide the text into segments whose limits coincide with units of the writer's thought. Tables of contents outline the entire book, and sometimes even chapters or articles within the book.
The absence of such visual structure markers does not mean that ancient authors were unmindful of the structure of their compositions or that their compositions had less rigorous structural patterns than our modern books. On the contrary, numerous linguistic studies of various unwritten tribal languages suggest that aurally oriented compositions generally feature sophisticated structural patterns, indeed often more sophisticated than our modern western counterparts. The blandness of an ancient text's appearance reflects rather the cultural reality that ancient texts were written primarily to be heard, not seen. Texts were normally intended to be read aloud, whether one was reading alone or to an audience. Accordingly, an ancient writer was compelled to use structural signals that would be perceptible to the listening audience. Signals were geared for the ear, not the eye, since visual markers would be of little value to a listening audience.

To study structure in the Hebrew Bible, then, requires paying serious attention to verbal structure indicators ─ as we do, for example, when we listen to a sermon and try to grasp its general outline and main points. The Hebrew Bible is full of such verbal structure clues (e.g., Amos's repeating line "for three transgressions of x, even of four, I will not turn back my wrath" or the periodic "these are the generations of x in Genesis). To follow a biblical author's organization, one must learn to watch for (or listen!) for aural structure markers.

The second difficulty in studying structure markers in the Hebrew Bible is that ancient Hebrew structuring patterns and techniques were different from ours. For example, symmetry [i.e., chiasmus], parallelism, and structured repetition appear throughout Old Testament literature;these and related patterns are so foreign to modern readers that it is easy to miss ─ or misunderstand ─ them. To investigate structure in the Hebrew Bible, the reader must lay aside Western expectations and watch for these less familiar structuring conventions that were indigenous to ancient Israel ─ much as modern linguists must do when working with unwritten tribal languages.

From the sound of it, it would seem that ancient audiences were probably much better at listening in comparison with a modern audience, just as blind people are often keener in hearing than those with good eyesight.


Bobcat

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Stranger
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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Bible

#19 Post by Stranger » 2 years ago

Bobcat wrote,

From the sound of it, it would seem that ancient audiences were probably much better at listening in comparison with a modern audience, just as blind people are often keener in hearing than those with good eyesight.
Hi Bobcat,

Could you sound this out a little bit more, I'm a little hard of hearing, but I'm not so blind that I cant see. :lol:



Stranger, (Ps 37:25)

Bobcat
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Re: Chiastic Structure in the Bible

#20 Post by Bobcat » 2 years ago

"I see" said the blind man, as he picked up his hammer and saw. :D


Bobcat (Ex 4:11)

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